reflets de lumière

Günter Brus

Posted in Art, Print by B on July 26, 2010

Self-Painting, Film Action, Studio Sailer, Vienna December 1964

Self-Painting, Film Action, Studio Sailer, Vienna, December 1964


Self-Painting, Photo Action, Perinet Cellar, Vienna, January 1965

Self-Painting, Photo Action, Perinet Cellar, Vienna, January 1965


Self-Painting, Photo Action, Perinet Cellar, Vienna, January 1965

Self-Painting, Photo Action, Perinet Cellar, Vienna, January 1965


Self-Mutilation, Film Action, Perinet Cellar, Vienna, January 1965

Self-Mutilation, Film Action, Perinet Cellar, Vienna, January 1965

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REMARKS ON SELF-PAINTING*

After my first action [Ana], I soon realised I would have to keep away for the time being from dynamic courses of action (monodramas). Before anything else, it was necessary to set down the ABC of my self-presentational language. And this consisted of self-painting, derived from abstract painting.

I viewed my body and the act of painting once again as a kind of “picture“, composed of my actions and observed by the camera. I described my plans to John Sailer, who allowed me to use his studio.

I arranged the action in three parts:

1. Hand painting
2. Head painting
3. Total head painting

Analogous to Arnulf Rainer’s “Overpaintings”, but extended by my own actionist means, the painter’s head was to become incorporated into the picture surface, become one with the picture and disappear into the picture. “Birth from obliteration,” as I wrote in a slightly different context, many years later. Admittedly my total head painting was only a partial success because it led to a distortion in my vision of myself (and of the painting). I was annoyed later by this shortcoming, for I realised that I had not demonstrated enough perseverance during the celebration. Generally speaking I always attempted to correct any errors in an action during the next one, when inevitably new ones would crop up. In my defence it should be said that “Direct Art” never afforded me the opportunity of improving a work at some later date, as was possible with normal working methods. It was thus necessary to put up with the weaknesses of a work and go along with them. This was all the more bitter for me when the piece was staged before an audience. However, putting myself in such an exposed situation was a deliberate aspect of my theoretical ideas. It helped me bring the fruits to ripeness.

Günter Brus

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Green, Malcolm. Brus, Muehl, Nitsch, Schwarzkogler: Writings of the Vienna Actionists. London: Atlas, 1999. Print.

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Günter Brus

Atlas Press

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Wim Wenders – Journey to Onomichi

Posted in Photography, Print by B on July 18, 2010

The Quay Wall
217,8 x 178cm


The House on the Corner
144 x 125 cm


Onomichi at Dusk
210,7 x 178 cm


The Chopper
124,5 x 125cm

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I have always wondered

where my favorite film (yes, of all times)

Tokyo Story,

(or Tokyo monogatari in Japanese)

actually takes place, except in Tokyo of course.

Yasujiro Ozu’s masterpiece from 1953

depicts a small seaside fishing town

in which the story begins and ends.

An old couple departs from there,

in order to visit their kids in the big city one last time.

After their return the old woman dies,

and her husband is left alone.

Eventually someone told me

that this coastal town was called Onomichi,

in the South of Japan.

So one day my wife and I

made the reverse journey

and traveled from Tokyo to Onomichi

where we stayed for a week.

Wim Wenders

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Wenders, Wim, and Heiner Bastian. Wim Wenders: Journey to Onomichi : Photographs. [München]: Schirmer/Mosel, 2009. Print.

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Wim Wenders

Schirmer/Mosel

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